Life on the Mississippi

Mark Twain

Mark Twain, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, led one of the most exciting of literary lives. Raised in the river town of Hannibal, Missouri, Twain had to leave school at age 12 and was successively a journeyman printer, a steamboat pilot, a halfhearted Confederate soldier, and a prospector, miner, and reporter in the western territories. His experiences furnished him with a wide knowledge of humanity, as well as with the perfect grasp of local customs and speech which manifests itself in his writing. With the publication in 1865 of "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," Twain gained national attention as a frontier humorist, and the bestselling Innocents Abroad solidified his fame. But it wasn't until Life on the Mississippi (1883), and finally, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), that he was recognized by the literary establishment as one of the greatest writers America would ever produce. Toward the end of his life, plagued by personal tragedy and financial failure, Twain grew more and more pessimistic--an outlook not alleviated by his natural skepticism and sarcasm. Though his fame continued to widen--Yale & Oxford awarded him honorary degrees--Twain spent his last years in gloom and exasperation, writing fables about "the damned human race." "From the Trade Paperback edition."

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この本の情報

書名 Life on the Mississippi
著作者等 Twain, Mark
シリーズ名 Bantam books
出版元 Bantam Books
刊行年月 1945
版表示 Authorized ed
ページ数 447 p.
大きさ 16 cm
ISBN 9785551629733
NCID BA20090699
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 アメリカ合衆国
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