Chimpanzee material culture : implications for human evolution

W.C. McGrew

The chimpanzee, of all other living species, is our closest relation, with whom we last shared a common ancestor about 5 million years ago. These African apes make and use a rich and varied kit of tools, and of the primates they are the only consistent and habitual tool-users and tool-makers. Chimpanzees meet the criteria of culture as originally defined for human beings by socio-cultural anthropologists. They show sex differences in using tools to obtain and to process a variety of plant and animal foods. The technological gap between chimpanzees and human societies that live by foraging (hunter-gatherers) is surprisingly narrow, at least for food-getting. Different communities of wild chimpanzees have different tool-kits, and not all of this regional and local variation can be explained by the demands of the physical and biotic environments in which they live. Some differences are likely to be customs based on socially derived and symbolically encoded traditions. Chimpanzees serve as heuristic, referential models for the reconstruction of cultural evolution in apes and humans from a common ancestor. However, chimpanzees are not humans, and key differences exist between them, though many of these apparent contrasts remain to be explored empirically and theoretically.

「Nielsen BookData」より

The chimpanzee, of all other living species, is our closest relation, with whom we last shared a common ancestor about 5 million years ago. These African apes make and use a rich and varied kit of tools, and of the primates they are the only consistent and habitual tool-users and tool-makers. Chimpanzees meet the criteria of culture as originally defined for human beings by socio-cultural anthropologists. They show sex differences in using tools to obtain and to process a variety of plant and animal foods. The technological gap between chimpanzees and human societies that live by foraging (hunter-gatherers) is surprisingly narrow, at least for food-getting. Different communities of wild chimpanzees have different tool-kits, and not all of this regional and local variation can be explained by the demands of the physical and biotic environments in which they live. Some differences are likely to be customs based on socially derived and symbolically encoded traditions. Chimpanzees serve as heuristic, referential models for the reconstruction of cultural evolution in apes and humans from a common ancestor. However, chimpanzees are not humans, and key differences exist between them, though many of these apparent contrasts remain to be explored empirically and theoretically.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • Preface
  • 1. Patterns of culture?
  • 2. Studying chimpanzees
  • 3. Chimpanzees as apes
  • 4. Cultured chimpanzees?
  • 5. Chimpanzee sexes
  • 6. Chimpanzees and foragers
  • 7. Chimpanzees compared
  • 8. Chimpanzee ethnology
  • 9. Chimpanzees as models
  • 10. What chimpanzees are, are not, and might be
  • References
  • Appendix
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • Preface
  • 1. Patterns of culture?
  • 2. Studying chimpanzees
  • 3. Chimpanzees as apes
  • 4. Cultured chimpanzees?
  • 5. Chimpanzee sexes
  • 6. Chimpanzees and foragers
  • 7. Chimpanzees compared
  • 8. Chimpanzee ethnology
  • 9. Chimpanzees as models
  • 10. What chimpanzees are, are not, and might be
  • References
  • Appendix
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

この本の情報

書名 Chimpanzee material culture : implications for human evolution
著作者等 McGrew, W. C.
McGrew William C.
出版元 Cambridge University Press
刊行年月 1992
ページ数 xvi, 277 p.
大きさ 24 cm
ISBN 0521423716
0521413036
NCID BA19679969
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 イギリス
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