Race, Hull-House, and the University of Chicago : a new conscience against ancient evils

Mary Jo Deegan

Examines Chicago race relations in the context of work at Hull-House and the University of Chicago between 1892 and 1960. Connecting the views of the Hull-House and early Chicago sociologists to issues of race and gender, Deegan offers a new perspective on race relations in Chicago from 1892 until 1960. She challenges the assumption that race relations activists had to choose either to align with W.E.B. DuBois or Booker T. Washington if they studied American race relations. Questioning the "established accounts" concerning the so-called Chicago way of thinking and doing sociology at the University of Chicago, she expands the role of the Chicago School of Race Relations by including more scholars, more political action, and more years within its compass. By examining the relationship between Hull-House, female and African-American sociologists, and the early Chicago school, Deegan dispells some of the common misconceptions that view Hull-House, especially, as an elitist, prejudiced, and moralistic institution. Chicago was a tumultuous place in 1892: immigration, industrialization, urbanization, and corruption created an atmosphere of profound change. Rising to the challenge, Jane Addams and her social settlement Hull-House saw hope for a new moral order and worked closely with friends and colleagues at the newly opened University of Chicago. Both institutions became centers for the study of society, including the peculiar nature of American race relations. Here, Deegan connects the views of the Hull-House and early Chicago sociologists to issues of race and gender, especially to the now-famous accounts of the Chicago school of sociology and its subgroup, the Chicago School of Race Relations. This thoughtful and carefully articulated analysis sheds light on the ways in which institutions and the people associated with them helped to shape sociological thought about race relations in particular and sociology in general

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[目次]

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • Rethinking Gender, Race, and Sociology in Chicago, 1892-1960
  • Introducing the HHSRR and the CSRR Segments, 1892-1935
  • Documenting the Hull-House School of Race Relations and the Early Chicago School of Race Relations, 1892-1920
  • W.E.B. DuBois and the Women of Hull-House, 1895-1899
  • Chicago Sociologists and the Founding of the NAACP, 1909-1915
  • Chicago Sociologists and the Founding of the CAACP, 1909-1911
  • Fighting Jim Crow in Chicago's Public Schools: The Color Line at Wendell Phillips High School, 1912-1915
  • Rethinking the Chicago School of Race Relations, 1920-1960
  • Transcending "The Marginal Man:" Challenging the Patriarchal Legacy of Robert E. Park in the CSRR
  • Wilmoth A. Carter and the Gendered Veil of the PCSRR
  • Professional Life Behind the Veil: E. Franklin Frazier's Breaching Experiments in Jim Crow America
  • Oliver C. Cox and Another New Conscience Against an Ancient Evil: The Redefined CSRR, 1892-1960
  • Conclusion
  • Recovering and Creating a New Conscience Against Ancient Evils
  • Bibliography
  • References.

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この本の情報

書名 Race, Hull-House, and the University of Chicago : a new conscience against ancient evils
著作者等 Deegan, Mary Jo
出版元 Praeger
刊行年月 2002
ページ数 xiii, 216 p.
大きさ 24 cm
ISBN 0275977765
NCID BA61003629
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 アメリカ合衆国
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