Manual of clinical nephrology of the Rogosin Kidney Center  pbk.

edited by Jhoong S. Cheigh, Kurt H. Stenzel, Albert L. Rubin

[目次]

  • 1. Evaluation of patients with renal disease.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Identifying Renal Disease.- 2.1. History.- 2.2. Family history.- 2.3. Physical examination.- 2.4. Urinalysis.- 2.5. The chemical data base.- 2.6. Radiologic techniques.- 2.7. Percutaneous renal biopsy.- 2.8. Risks and cost of procedures.- 3. Syndromes of Renal Disease.- 3.1. Acute renal failure.- 3.2. Chronic renal failure.- 3.3. Acute nephritic syndrome.- 3.4. Nephrotic syndrome.- 3.5. Urinary tract infection.- 3.6. Obstructive nephropathy.- 3.7. Renal tubular dysfunction.- 3.8. Nephrolithiasis.- 3.9. Accelerated hypertension.- 4. Conclusion.- 2. Disorders of water, sodium and potassium metabolism.- 1. Maintenance of Osmotic Homeostasis.- 1.1. General considerations.- 1.2. Free-water clearance.- 1.3. Renal concentrating and diluting mechanisms.- 1.4. Antidiuretic hormone.- 1.5. Summary of requirements for maximum water diuresis $$\left( {{C_{{H_2}O}}} \right)$$.- 2. Clinical States Associated with Hypo-osmolality.- 2.1. True dilutional hyponatremia.- 2.2. Renal failure.- 2.3. Decreased delivery of filtrate to diluting segment of the nephron.- 2.4. Syndrome of inappropriate ADH (SIADH).- 2.5 Drugs associated with impaired free-water clearance.- 2.6. Endocrine deficiencies.- 2.7. Reset osmostat.- 2.8. Summary of the diagnostic approach to hyponatremia.- 3. Hypernatremia and Disorders of Urine Concentration.- 3.1. Low circulating levels of ADH.- 3.2. Renal tubular hyporesponsiveness to ADH (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus).- 3.3. Diagnostic approach to the patient with a disorder of urinary concentration.- 4. Disorders of Sodium Metabolism.- 4.1. Determinants of renal sodium excretion.- 4.2. Sodium retaining states (edema).- 4.3. Diuretic therapy.- 5. Disorders of Potassium Metabolism.- 5.1. Internal potassium balance.- 5.2. External potassium balance.- 5.3. Hyperkalemia.- 5.4. Hypokalemia.- 3. Acid-base disturbances.- 1. Introduction.- 1.1. Physiologic buffers.- 1.2. Respiratory control of pH.- 1.3. Renal control of H + excretion.- 1.4. Clinical definitions.- 1.5. Diagnostic approach.- 2. Metabolic Acidosis.- 2.1. Anion gap.- 2.2. Metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap.- 2.3. Metabolic acidosis associated with a normal anion gap (hyperchloremic).- 2.4. Treatment of metabolic acidosis.- 3. Metabolic Alkalosis.- 3.1. Metabolic alkalosis associated with low urinary Cl -.- 3.2. Metabolic alkalosis associated with normal or increased urinary Cl -.- 3.3. Treatment of metabolic alkalosis.- 4. Respiratory Alkalosis.- 5. Respiratory Acidosis.- 6. Mixed Acid-Base Disorders.- 4. Glomerulonephropathies.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Asymptomatic Urinary Abnormalities.- 2.1. Hematuria.- 2.2. Asymptomatic proteinuria.- 2.3. Asymptomatic proteinuria and hematuria.- 3. Nephrotic Syndrome.- 3.1. Definition.- 3.2. Pathogenesis of proteinuria.- 3.3. Patient presentation and evaluation.- 3.4. Clinicopathological correlation.- 4. Acute Nephritic Syndrome.- 4.1. Definition.- 4.2. Patient presentation and evaluation.- 4.3. Clinicopathological correlation.- 4.4. Management of acute nephritic syndrome.- 4.5. Prognosis.- 5. Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis (RPGN).- 5.1. Definition.- 5.2. Patient presentation and evaluation.- 5.3. Clinicopathological correlation.- 6. Chronic Nephritic Syndrome.- 6.1. Definition.- 6.2. Patient presentation and evaluation.- 7. Glomerulonephritis and Systemic Disease.- 7.1. Metabolic and inherited diseases.- 7.2. Hereditary nephritis.- 7.3. Infectious disease.- 7.4. Toxic nephropathy.- 7.5. Collagen vascular disease.- 7.6. Dysproteinemias.- 7.7. Pregnancy.- 5. Urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis.- 1. Prevalence.- 1.1. Overall incidence.- 1.2. Prevalence of urinary tract infection in children.- 1.3. Prevalence of urinary tract infection in adults.- 2. Clinical Significance of Bacteriuria.- 2.1. Pregnancy and urinary tract infection.- 2.2. Hypertension and urinary tract infection.- 2.3. Diabetes and urinary tract infection.- 2.4. Bacteriuria in non-pregnant women.- 2.5. Bacteriuria in children.- 2.6. Bacteriuria in men.- 2.7. Nosocomial urinary tract infections.- 3. Pathogenesis.- 3.1. Local barriers of invasion.- 3.2. Cervico-vaginal antibodies.- 3.3. Uroepithelial antibodies.- 3.4. Systemic antibody response.- 3.5. Other mechanisms.- 3.6. Vesicoureteral valve.- 4. Etiology.- 4.1. Bacterial infection.- 4.2. Fungal infections.- 4.3. Viral infection.- 5. Clinical Manifestations.- 6. Diagnosis.- 6.1. Urine collection.- 6.2. Microscopic examination.- 6.3. Localization.- 7. Management.- 7.1. Asymptomatic bacteriuria.- 7.2. Acute pyelonephritis.- 7.3. Recurrent infections.- 7.4. Antibiotics.- 7.5. Prophylaxis.- 6. Tubulo-interstitial nephritis.- 1. Hereditary Kidney Diseases.- 1.1. Medullary cystic disease.- 1.2. Medullary sponge kidney.- 1.3. Hereditary familial nephritis (Alport's syndrome).- 2. Metabolic Kidney Diseases.- 2.1. Hypercalcemia.- 2.2. Hypokalemia.- 2.3. Oxalate nephropathy.- 2.4. Gouty nephropathy.- 3. Hematologic Diseases.- 3.1. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome.- 3.2. Sickle cell anemia.- 4. Vascular Diseases.- 5. Neoplastic Diseases.- 6. Infections.- 7. Immunological Diseases.- 7.1. Antitubular basement membrane antibodies.- 7.2. Immune complex interstitial nephritis.- 7.3. Reflux nephropathy.- 7.4. Drug-related interstitial nephritis.- 7.5. Renal allografts.- 7.6. Sjogren's syndrome.- 8. Analgesic Nephropathy.- 8.1. Aspirin.- 8.2. Phenacetin.- 8.3. Pathology.- 8.4. Pathogenesis.- 8.5. Clinical manifestations.- 9. Heavy Metals.- 10. Balkan Nephropathy.- 11. Radiation Nephritis.- 7. Cystic diseases of the kidney.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Cystic Dysplasia.- 2.1. Renal aplasia.- 2.2. Congenital multicystic kidney.- 2.3. Pathology.- 2.4. Etiology and pathogenesis.- 2.5. Clinical presentation.- 2.6. Diagnosis.- 2.7. Prognosis and therapy.- 3. Polycystic Disease.- 3.1. Infantile polycystic disease.- 3.2. Adult polycystic disease.- 4. Medullary Cysts of the Kidney.- 4.1. Medullary sponge kidney.- 4.2. Medullary cystic disease.- 4.3. Renal-retinal dysplasia.- 5. Cysts of the Renal Cortex.- 6. Renal Cysts in Hereditary Syndromes.- 8. Urolithiasis.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Pathogenesis of Stone.- 3. Diagnosis of Stone Disease.- 3.1. History.- 3.2. Physical examination.- 3.3. Urinalysis.- 3.4. Radiography.- 4. Management of Stone Disease.- 4.1. General principles.- 4.2. Identification of anatomic or metabolic disorders.- 4.3. Fluid intake.- 4.4. Diet.- 4.5. Urinary tract infection.- 4.6. Classification of stone activity.- 5. Cystine Stones.- 6. Uric Acid Stones.- 7. Xanthine Stones.- 8. Calcium Stones.- 8.1. Hypercalciuria.- 8.2. Other causes of calcium stone formation.- 9. The Evaluation of the Recurrent Stone Former.- 10. Timing of Surgical Intervention.- 9. Drug-related nephropathy.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Acute Tubular Necrosis.- 2.1. Predisposing factors.- 2.2. Incidence.- 2.3. Clinical features.- 3. Tubulo-Interstitial Disease.- 3.1. Acute tubulo-interstitial disease.- 3.2. Chronic tubulo-interstitial disease.- 4. Glomerulonephritis, Nephrotic Syndrome and Vasculitis.- 4.1. Acute glomerulonephritis.- 4.2. Chronic glomerulopathy.- 4.3. Vasculitis.- 5. Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.- 6. Obstructive Uropathy.- 7. Fluid, Electrolyte and Acid-Base Disorders.- 7.1. Antidiuresis and dilutional hyponatremia.- 7.2. Diabetes insipidus.- 7.3. Potassium imbalance.- 7.4. Acid-base imbalance.- 10. Acute renal failure.- 1. Clinical Recognition of Acute Renal Failure.- 1.1. Urine volume.- 1.2. Azotemia.- 1.3. Urine sediment.- 1.4. Urine chemistries.- 1.5. Radiologic investigation.- 2. Management of ARF.- 2.1. Prevention.- 2.2. Established parenchymal ARF.- 3. The Recovery Phase.- 11. Chronic renal failure.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Pathophysiology of Chronic Renal Failure.- 2.1. Compensatory growth.- 2.2 Adaptive mechanisms.- 3. Uremia.- 3.1. Pathogenesis of uremia.- 3.2. Uremic complications.- 4. Preparation for Dialysis and Transplantation.- 12. Renal hypertension.- 1. Renovascular Hypertension.- 1.1. Renal artery stenosis.- 1.2. Hypertension in other forms of unilateral renal disease.- 2. Acute Renal Failure.- 2.1. Acute glomerulonephritis.- 2.2. Ischemic and nephrotoxic acute renal failure.- 2.3. Obstructive uropathy.- 3. Chronic Renal Failure.- 3.1. Sodium-volume factors.- 3.2. Vasoconstrictor factors.- 4. Transplantation.- 4.1. Persistence of pre-transplant hypertension-The role of the recipient's kidneys.- 4.2. Acute rejection.- 4.3. Corticosteroids.- 4.4. Transplant renal artery stenosis.- 4.5. Hypercalcemia.- 4.6. Chronic rejection.- 5. Pharmacologic Therapy of Hypertension in Renal Disease.- 5.1. Diuretics.- 5.2. Beta-adrenergic blockers.- 5.3. Drugs acting on the central nervous system.- 5.4. Vasodilators.- 5.5. Parenteral drugs for hypertensive emergencies.- 13. Divalent ion metabolism and renal osteodystrophy.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Metabolism of Vitamin D.- 3. Pathogenesis of Abnormalities in Divalent Ion Metabolism in Chronic Renal Failure.- 3.1. Phosphate retention.- 3.2. Bone resistance to the calcemic effect of parathormone.- 3.3. Abnormalities in Vitamin D metabolism.- 4. Clinical Consequences of Abnormal Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism.- 4.1. Skeletal abnormalities.- 4.2. Non-skeletal complications.- 5. Management.- 5.1. General guidelines for therapy.- 5.2. Control of phosphorus.- 5.3. Vitamin D therapy.- 5.4. Calcium supplementation.- 5.5. Other medical therapy.- 5.6. Subtotal parathyroidectomy.- 6. Post-Transplant Mineral Homeostasis.- 7. Mineral Homeostasis in Acute Renal Failure.- 8. Mineral Replacement Therapy.- 8.1. Calcium and magnesium.- 8.2. Phosphorus.- 14. Dialysis treatment.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Hemodialysis.- 2.1. Principles of hemodialysis.- 2.2. Indications for dialysis.- 2.3. Type of dialyzer.- 2.4. Fluid delivery systems.- 2.5. Acute problems during dialysis treatment.- 2.6. Chronic problems in hemodialysis.- 2.7. Options in types of hemodialysis.- 2.8. General management of hemodialysis patients.- 2.9. Medication for dialysis patients.- 2.10. Acute hemodialysis.- 3. Peritoneal Dialysis.- 3.1. Peritoneal membrane characteristics.- 3.2. Peritoneal dialysate.- 3.3. Permanent peritoneal catheters.- 3.4. Automated peritoneal dialysis devices.- 3.5. Management of peritoneal dialysis patients.- 3.6. Complications of peritoneal dialysis.- 3.7. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.- 4. Conclusion.- 15. Kidney transplantation.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Donors and Recipients.- 2.1. Living related donors.- 2.2. Cadaveric donors.- 2.3. Recipients.- 3. Immunological Aspects of Renal Transplantation.- 3.1. Human major histocompatibility complex.- 3.2. Genetic and inheritance patterns of the MHC.- 3.3. Identification of HLA- A, B, C antigens.- 3.4. Identification of DRw antigens.- 3.5. Mixed lymphocyte culture.- 3.6. Role of HLA antigens in renal transplantation.- 3.7. Role of ABO blood group antigens in renal transplantation.- 3.8. In vitro techniques to detect alloimmunity.- 4. Medical Management of the Transplant Recipient.- 4.1. Pre-transplant evaluation.- 4.2. Immunosuppressive therapy.- 4.3. Post-transplant management.- 4.4. Immunologic problems.- 4.5. Results and factors affecting transplantation.- 4.6. Immunologic monitoring of the renal allograft recipient.- 5. Complications.- 5.1. Primary non-function.- 5.2. Urinary leakage.- 5.3. Lymphocele.- 5.4. Infections.- 5.5. Hypertension.- 5.6. Lipid abnormalities.- 5.7. Gastrointestinal system.- 5.8. Bone disease.- 5.9. Malignancy.- 5.10. Recurrence of the original disease in renal grafts.- 5.11. Miscellaneous complications.- 6. Future Prospects.- 16. Dialysis and transplantation: dietary management.- 1. Dietary Management for Patients with Chronic Renal Failure Not Treated with Dialysis.- 1.1. General principles.- 1.2. Protein intake.- 1.3. Caloric supply.- 1.4. Fluid, sodium and potassium intake.- 1.5. Vitamin supplements.- 1.6. Mineral requirements.- 2. Dietary Management for Patients with Chronic Renal Failure Treated with Dialysis.- 2.1. Dietary protein intake for patients treated with hemodialysis.- 2.2. Dietary protein intake for patients treated with peritoneal dialysis.- 2.3. Caloric requirements during maintenance dialysis.- 2.4. Vitamin requirements during maintenance dialysis.- 2.5. Anabolic steroids.- 2.6. Management of inadequate protein and caloric intake.- 2.7. Evaluation of adequate dietary intake.- 3. Dietary Management for Patients with Acute Renal Failure.- 4. Parenteral Nutrition.- 17. Dialysis and transplantation: psychological management.- 1. Introduction.- 2. The Advent of Terminal Renal Failure.- 2.1. Minimization and denial.- 2.2. Hypervigilant behavior.- 3. The Meaning of Hemodialysis and its Impact upon Adaptation.- 4. The Process of Adaptation.- 5. Transplantation.- 6. Personality Types and Medical Management.- 6.1. The non-compliant denying patient and the need to accept limitations.- 6.2. The dependent clinging patient and the need to set limits.- 6.3. The entitled demanding patient and the need to allow the patient some control.- 7. Specific Clinical Syndromes and their Management.- 7.1. Painful feeling states.- 7.2. Organic brain syndrome and functional psychosis.- 18. Dialysis and transplantation: surgical management.- 1. Introduction.- 2. General Principles.- 2.1. Timing of surgery.- 2.2. Anemia.- 2.3. Hypertension.- 2.4. Corticosteroids.- 2.5. Operative and postoperative fluid management.- 2.6. Hemostasis.- 2.7. Postoperative dialysis.- 2.8. Wound healing.- 3. Anesthetic Management.- 3.1. General evaluation.- 3.2. Choice of agents.- 4. Surgical Aspects of Dialysis.- 4.1. Peritoneal dialysis.- 4.2. Hemodialysis.- 5. Surgical Considerations of Transplant Candidates.- 5.1. Indications for pre-transplant nephrectomy and ureterectomy.- 5.2. Indications for pre-transplant lower urinary tract corrective surgery.- 6. Cadaveric Kidneys.- 6.1. Cadaveric donors.- 6.2. Cadaveric nephrectomy.- 6.3. Cadaveric kidney storage.- 7. Surgical Aspects of Renal Transplantation.- 7.1. Transplant procedure.- 7.2. Surgical problems following transplantation.- 19. Drug metabolism and dose adjustment in patients with renal failure.- 1. Drug Metabolism in Uremia.- 1.1. Biotransformation.- 1.2. Effect of renal failure.- 1.3. Retention of active drug metabolites.- 1.4. Retention of inactive metabolites.- 2. Dose Adjustment in Renal Failure.- 2.1. Antimicrobial drugs.- 2.2. Urinary antiseptics.- 2.3. Antimycotic drugs.- 2.4. Antituberculosis drugs.- 2.5. Antimalarial drugs.- 2.6. Diuretics.- 2.7. Antihypertensive drugs.- 2.8. Drugs acting on the heart.- 2.9. Antiarthritic drugs.- 2.10. Analgesic drugs.- 2.11. Anticonvulsant drugs.- 2.12. Immunosuppressive drugs.- 2.13. Hypoglycemic drugs.- 2.14. Anticoagulants.- 3. Dialysis of Drugs and Poisons.- Appendices.- 1. Composition of Electrolyte and Colloid Solutions.- 2. Normal Arterial Blood Pressure.- 3. Nomogram for Estimation of Endogenous Creatinine Clearance.- 4. Nomogram for Calculating the Body Surface Area of Adults.- 5. Conversion Tables.- Temperature.- Weight.- Height.- 6. WHO Nomenclature for Factors of the HLA System.- 7. Elements and Atomic Weights.- 8. Normal Chemical Values of Body Fluids.

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この本の情報

書名 Manual of clinical nephrology of the Rogosin Kidney Center
著作者等 Cheigh, Jhoong S.
Rogosin Kidney Center
Rubin, Albert L.
Stenzel, Kurt H.
Rubin A. M. (The New York Hospital)
Stenzel K. H
Cheigh Jhoong S.
シリーズ名 Developments in nephrology
巻冊次 pbk.
出版元 M. Nijhoff;distributors for the U.S. and Canada, Kluwer Boston
刊行年月 1981
版表示 Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1981
ページ数 xxi, 491 p.
大きさ 25 cm
ISBN 9024723973
NCID BA11411962
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 オランダ
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