Dialogue games : an approach to discourse analysis

Lauri Carlson

[目次]

  • I: Dialogue Games.- 1 / Aims of the Game.- 1. Functions of Language.- 2. Aims vs. Means.- 3. Gambling with Truth.- 4. The Maxim of Agreement.- 2 / Propositional Attitudes.- 1. Information Sets.- 2. The Problem of Logical Omniscience.- 3. Model Sets and Model Systems.- 4. Impossible Possible Worlds.- 5. Assumption Lists as 'Small Worlds'.- 6. An Example of a Dialogue Game Situation.- 7. The Aims of the Game Revisited.- 3 / Questions.- 1. Indirect Questions.- 2. Direct Questions.- 3. Answers to Search Questions.- 4. Conclusiveness.- 5. What-questions.- 6. Who-questions.- 7. Personal Identity.- 8. Descriptive vs. Demonstrative Criteria.- 9. Relative Identification.- 4 / Dialogue Game Rules.- 1. Simplest Theory of Dialogue.- 2. Relevance.- 3. Meaning Conventions.- 4. Suggestions.- 5. Suppositions.- 6. Examples of Dialogue Strategies.- 7. Rules vs. Strategies.- 8. Derived Rules.- 9. Game Rules for Questions.- 10. Answering.- 11. Logical Moves.- 12. Arguments.- 13. Replies.- 5 / Structure of Dialogue.- 1. Structure of Dialogue.- 2. Parameters of a Move.- 3. Internal Dialogues.- 4. Playing for Others.- 5. Dialogue Games.- 6. Turn-taking and Topic Hierarchy.- 6 / Logical Game Rules.- 1. Logical Game Rules.- 2. Logical Game Rules for Questions.- 3. Game Rules for Search Questions.- 4. Which-questions.- 5. Conclusiveness.- 7 / Logic of Dialogue.- 1. Consistency.- 2. Indirect Inference.- 3. Inductive Decision.- 4. Answerhood.- 5. Implied Questions.- 6. Dialogical Entailment.- 7. Conversational Implicature.- 8. Self-transparency.- 8 / Question-Answer Dialogues.- 1. Language-games vs. Speech Acts.- 2. Pleading Ignorance.- 3. Rejection of Questions.- 4. Eliciting Questions.- 5. A Three-person Dialogue.- 6. Questions Implying Ignorance.- 7. Biased Questions.- 8. Elementary Questions.- 9. Rhetorical Questions.- 10. Tag Questions.- 11. Echo Questions.- Appendix I.- Appendix II.- II: Discourse Grammar.- 1 / Discourse Grammar.- 1. Discourse Analysis and Discourse Grammar.- 2. Appropriateness, Coherence, and Cohesion.- 3. Autonomy of Discourse Grammar.- 2 / Connectives.- 1. And.- 2. Or.- 3. Inclusive or Exclusive Or.- 4. But.- 5. Applications of (D.but).- 6. Implications of (D.but).- 7. But in Dialogue.- 8. But and the Abstract Performative Hypothesis.- 9. The Logicians' But.- 10. Russian Adversative Conjunctions.- 3 / Old and New Information.- 1. Sentence Grammar vs. Functional Syntax.- 2. Stylistic Rules.- 3. Functional Definitions.- 4. Matching.- 5. Word Order.- 6. Topicalization.- 7. VP Preposing.- 8. Focus Topicalization.- 9. Other Uses of Topicalization.- 10. Functional Definitions Refined.- 11. Kuno's Classification and Japanese wa vs. ga.- 4 / Given vs. Known Information.- 1. Subordination and Thematicity.- 2. Factivity.- 3. Cleft Sentences.- 4. It-Clefts.- 5 / Aboutness.- 1. A Traditional Ambiguity in the Notion of 'Theme'.- 2. Invalid Arguments for Independence.- 3. Ab outness.- 4. Dialogue Subjects.- 5. Subject and Topic.- 6. Evidence for Dialogue Subjects: (D.subject).- 7. Evidence from Anaphora.- 8. So-called Dislocations.- 9. Right Dislocation.- 10. As for.- Notes.- Index of Names.- Index of Subjects.- Index of Rules.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • I: Dialogue Games.- 1 / Aims of the Game.- 1. Functions of Language.- 2. Aims vs. Means.- 3. Gambling with Truth.- 4. The Maxim of Agreement.- 2 / Propositional Attitudes.- 1. Information Sets.- 2. The Problem of Logical Omniscience.- 3. Model Sets and Model Systems.- 4. Impossible Possible Worlds.- 5. Assumption Lists as 'Small Worlds'.- 6. An Example of a Dialogue Game Situation.- 7. The Aims of the Game Revisited.- 3 / Questions.- 1. Indirect Questions.- 2. Direct Questions.- 3. Answers to Search Questions.- 4. Conclusiveness.- 5. What-questions.- 6. Who-questions.- 7. Personal Identity.- 8. Descriptive vs. Demonstrative Criteria.- 9. Relative Identification.- 4 / Dialogue Game Rules.- 1. Simplest Theory of Dialogue.- 2. Relevance.- 3. Meaning Conventions.- 4. Suggestions.- 5. Suppositions.- 6. Examples of Dialogue Strategies.- 7. Rules vs. Strategies.- 8. Derived Rules.- 9. Game Rules for Questions.- 10. Answering.- 11. Logical Moves.- 12. Arguments.- 13. Replies.- 5 / Structure of Dialogue.- 1. Structure of Dialogue.- 2. Parameters of a Move.- 3. Internal Dialogues.- 4. Playing for Others.- 5. Dialogue Games.- 6. Turn-taking and Topic Hierarchy.- 6 / Logical Game Rules.- 1. Logical Game Rules.- 2. Logical Game Rules for Questions.- 3. Game Rules for Search Questions.- 4. Which-questions.- 5. Conclusiveness.- 7 / Logic of Dialogue.- 1. Consistency.- 2. Indirect Inference.- 3. Inductive Decision.- 4. Answerhood.- 5. Implied Questions.- 6. Dialogical Entailment.- 7. Conversational Implicature.- 8. Self-transparency.- 8 / Question-Answer Dialogues.- 1. Language-games vs. Speech Acts.- 2. Pleading Ignorance.- 3. Rejection of Questions.- 4. Eliciting Questions.- 5. A Three-person Dialogue.- 6. Questions Implying Ignorance.- 7. Biased Questions.- 8. Elementary Questions.- 9. Rhetorical Questions.- 10. Tag Questions.- 11. Echo Questions.- Appendix I.- Appendix II.- II: Discourse Grammar.- 1 / Discourse Grammar.- 1. Discourse Analysis and Discourse Grammar.- 2. Appropriateness, Coherence, and Cohesion.- 3. Autonomy of Discourse Grammar.- 2 / Connectives.- 1. And.- 2. Or.- 3. Inclusive or Exclusive Or.- 4. But.- 5. Applications of (D.but).- 6. Implications of (D.but).- 7. But in Dialogue.- 8. But and the Abstract Performative Hypothesis.- 9. The Logicians' But.- 10. Russian Adversative Conjunctions.- 3 / Old and New Information.- 1. Sentence Grammar vs. Functional Syntax.- 2. Stylistic Rules.- 3. Functional Definitions.- 4. Matching.- 5. Word Order.- 6. Topicalization.- 7. VP Preposing.- 8. Focus Topicalization.- 9. Other Uses of Topicalization.- 10. Functional Definitions Refined.- 11. Kuno's Classification and Japanese wa vs. ga.- 4 / Given vs. Known Information.- 1. Subordination and Thematicity.- 2. Factivity.- 3. Cleft Sentences.- 4. It-Clefts.- 5 / Aboutness.- 1. A Traditional Ambiguity in the Notion of 'Theme'.- 2. Invalid Arguments for Independence.- 3. Ab outness.- 4. Dialogue Subjects.- 5. Subject and Topic.- 6. Evidence for Dialogue Subjects: (D.subject).- 7. Evidence from Anaphora.- 8. So-called Dislocations.- 9. Right Dislocation.- 10. As for.- Notes.- Index of Names.- Index of Subjects.- Index of Rules.

「Nielsen BookData」より

この本の情報

書名 Dialogue games : an approach to discourse analysis
著作者等 Carlson, Lauri
シリーズ名 Synthese language library
出版元 D. Reidel Pub. Co.
Sold and Kluwer Boston
刊行年月 c1983
版表示 Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1985
ページ数 xxiii, 317 p.
大きさ 23 cm
ISBN 9027719519
902771455X
NCID BA03484880
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 オランダ
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