The Wellesley index to Victorian periodicals, 1824-1900  v. 1 ~ v. 5

Walter E. Houghton, editor ; Josef L. Altholz ... [et al.], associate editors

The four volumes of the Wellesley Index which have been published over the past twenty-two years have proven an indispensable resource for scholars in a number of fields of study. This fifth and final volume provides new access to the other four, and to Victorian journals and writing in general. It offers a comprehensive register by author's name or pseudonym of all contributors to the journals included in the Index proper. In its two parts Volume V lists, alphabetically by periodical and chronologically by date of publication, all articles attributed by the Index to each writer or pseudonymous writer. Thus emerges a comprehensive picture of the interests of each writer and the development of his or her career.Volume V provides invaluable access to the other volumes of the Wellesley Index, which in turn offer access to a large body of other works. The Wellesley Index has already earned a central place among resources for the Victorian period; with the publication of this volume it is now complete.

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The importance of Victorian periodicals to modern scholars can scarcely be exaggerated. In scores of journals and thousands of articles there is a remarkable record of contemporary thought in every field, with a full range of opinion on every major question - a range exceeding what could be found, in many cases, in such books as were devoted to the topic being investigated. Furthermore, reviews and magazines reflect the current situation and are indispensable for the study of opinion at a given moment or in a short span of years. Because nearly 75 per cent of all the articles in Victorian journals were published anonymously or pseudonymously,the identification of most of these writings is the major contribution of The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals. The Index has made possible, for the first time, bibliographies of the periodical writings of almost ten thousand writers in thrity-five major journals. By assigning an average of 87 per cent of the articles to their contributors, it as enabled the scholar to read them more intelligently by knowing the charactersitic outlook of the author, and has provided the student of a particular writer with the names of the principal critics of his work. By opening up new possibilities for the study of men and ideas, the Wellesley Index is proving to be an invaluable guide to the history of Victorian opinion in the fields of religion, politics, science, economics, travel, law, linguistics, music, the fine arts, and literature.

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With the eight additional periodicals indexed in this fourth and last research volume, the bibliographical and biographical research of the editors and collaborators of the Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals will have identified altogether nearly 12,000 authors as the anonymous or pseudonymous contributors to forty- three major British monthlies and quarterlies. Volume IV's selection serves the series' overall goal of fairly representing the diversity in purpose and content as well as the literary excellence of British periodical journalism between 1824 and 1900; it also offers in this single volume much of the wide range of religious, political, social, literary, and commercial motivations underlying the efflorescence of publications of high quality in that society.In this volume, at opposite ends of the political spectrum are the initially radical and Benthamite Tail's Edinburgh Magazine and the Anglo-lrish, vehemently Tory Dublin University Magazine. The short-lived Dark Blue, with its constellation of distinguished authors, was, like the Dublin University Magazine, the result of ambitious collegiate entrepreneurship, but, emerging in 1871, was almost exclusively devoted to literature and aesthetic criticism. Also included in this volume are two more important quarterlies, the Congregationalist British Quarterly Review and the Methodist London Quarterly Review. Although of sectarian foundation, each aspired successfully to address, from the perspective of its own religious convictions, a general readership with a wide variety of interests and curiosities. Finally, in the category of the frankly popular, family-oriented monthly featuring fiction and general-interest articles, magazines whose purpose was quite as much to entertain as to inform, there are Bentley's Miscellany, first edited by Dickens, and, towards the end of our period, Longman 's Magazine.Volume IV conforms to the format of the first three volumes. In Part A an introductory essay on the publication history of each periodical is followed by each issue's Table of Contents, including the authorial signature, the Index attribution, and the evidence for that attribution. Part B provides bibliographies of the identified contributors together with identifying biographical data and the source of that data. Part C is an alphabetical bibliographical table of identified and unidentified pseudonyms and initials. An extensive appendix of corrections and additions updates the contents of Volumes I, II, and III.

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The importance of Victorian periodicals to modern scholars can scarcely be exaggerated. In scores of journals and thousands of articles there is a remarkable record of contemporary thought in every field, with a full range of opinion on every major question - a range exceeding what could be found, in many cases, in such books as were devoted to the topic being investigated. Furthermore, reviews and magazines reflect the current situation and are indispensable for the study of opinion at a given moment or in a short span of years. Because nearly 75 per cent of all the articles in Victorian journals were published anonymously or pseudonymously,the identification of most of these writings is the major contribution of The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals. The Index has made possible, for the first time, bibliographies of the periodical writings of almost ten thousand writers in thrity-five major journals. By assigning an average of 87 per cent of the articles to their contributors, it as enabled the scholar to read them more intelligently by knowing the charactersitic outlook of the author, and has provided the student of a particular writer with the names of the principal critics of his work. The editors of the Index have chosen an initial date in the mid-twenties because the age seems to begin with the recognition, patent in the early essays of Carlyle, Macaulay, and Mill, that radical changes in politics and religion were on the horizon. The particular year, 1824, marked the founding of a major vehicle of new ideas, the Westminster Review. Index I covered eight journals, among them the Edinburgh (from its beginning in 1802), the Quarterly, the Contemporary, and the North British Reviews, together with Blackwoodd's Magazine and the Cornhill. Index II continued with the Dublin and Fortnightly Reviews, the Nineteenth Century, and, among magazines, Fraser's and the Pre-Raphaelite Oxford and Cambridge.Volume III now adds fifteen more periodicals: Ainsworth's Magazine, the Atlantis, the British and Foreign Review, Mill's London Review and London and Westminster Review, the Modern Review, the Monthly Chronicle, Bagehot and Hutton's National Review, the New Monthly Magazine (1821-1854), the New Review, the Prospective Review, Saint Pauls Magazine, Temple Bar, the Theological Reviews, and the Westminster Review. It also contains an appendix of corrections and additions to Volumes I and II.In all three volumes, Part A contains a tabular view of the contents, issue by issue, with the exception of poetry. This provides a student with the contents of a journal not available in a particular library. Moreover, when the contents of a number of journals are examined together, it becomes a record of the subjects being discussed in a given year or during a given period of time. Part B is a bibliography of articles arranged under the contributors' names. It provides, for most authors, the only list of their periodical writings, and in nearly all cases a more extensive one than now exists, because the unveiling of anonymity has meant the recapturing of "new" work. The combination of Parts A and B enables a scholar to learn either who wrote a given article or story, or what articles and stories were written by a given author. Part C is the first index of pseudonyms for nineteenth-century English periodicals. By opening up new possibilities for the study of men and ideas, the Wellesley Index is proving to be an invaluable guide to the history of Victorian opinion in the fields of religion, politics, science, economics, travel, law, linguistics, music, the fine arts, and literature.

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この本の情報

書名 The Wellesley index to Victorian periodicals, 1824-1900
著作者等 Altholz, Josef Lewis
Houghton, Walter Edwards
Slingerland, Jean Harris
Wellesley College
Houghton Walter E.
Houghton Esther Rhoads
巻冊次 v. 1
v. 2
v. 3
v. 4
v. 5
出版元 Routledge & K. Paul
University of Toronto Press
刊行年月 c1966-c1989
ページ数 5 v.
大きさ 26 cm
ISBN 0415030005
0415030536
0415030544
0710000650
0710075014
0710214421
0802013937
0802019102
0802022537
0802026885
0802057217
0802027199
NCID BA01234656
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 カナダ
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