The correspondence of Charles Darwin  v. 1. 1821-1836 ~ v. 27. 1879

[editors, Frederick Burkhardt, Sydney Smith]

As the sheer volume of his correspondence indicates, 1862 was a very productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments he carried out. The promotion of his theory of natural selection also continued: Darwin's own work on it expanded, Thomas Henry Huxley gave lectures about it, and Henry Walter Bates invoked it to explain mimicry in butterflies. As well as monitoring the progress of his scientific work, the correspondence also records the continuing effects of Darwin's ill-health. Serious illness in two of his children also disrupts his work.

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Charles Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from all over the world, and to discuss his emerging ideas with scientific colleagues, many of whom he never met in person. In January of 1868, Darwin's Variation Under Domestication was published. The first printing of 1500 copies rapidly sold out and the publisher, John Murray, ordered a second printing. Responses to this new book, added to Darwin's continuing research into sexual selection and the expression of the emotions, increased the quantity of Darwin's correspondence to such an extent that the letters from 1868 fill two volumes. The letters he wrote and received during this year are presented here in chronological order across two volumes, with notes and appendices to put them into context, explain references, and provide information on related works. For information on the Charles Darwin Correspondence Project, see http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk.

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During 1867 Darwin intensified lines of research that were to result in two important publications, Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex and Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. Darwin circulated a questionnaire on human expression, asking his established contacts to pass it on to their acquaintances, with the result that he began to receive letters from an even more diverse and far-flung network of correspondents than had previously been the case. Convinced that human descent was strongly influenced by sexual selection, he also started to ask his correspondents about sexual differences in animals and birds. At the same time, he was working on the proof-sheets of another major work, Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, while negotiating almost weekly with French, German, and Russian translators. For information on the Charles Darwin Correspondence Project, see http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/Departments/Darwin.

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The Correspondence of Charles Darwin provides, for the first time, full, authoritative texts of all known and available letters to and from Charles Darwin. The letters are accompanied by detailed explanatory footnotes and supplementary materials, and offer unparalleled insight into Darwin's experiments, thoughts, friendships, and family life. Volume 13 of this continuing series contains letters for 1865, when Darwin published his long paper on climbing plants and continued working on his book, The Variation of Plants and Animals under Domestication. In this year, Robert FitzRoy, former captain of HMS Beagle, committed suicide; Darwin's great friend Joseph Dalton Hooker became director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; and Charles Lyell and John Lubbock quarrelled over an alleged incident of plagiarism. The volume also contains a supplement of over 100 letters discovered or redated since the series began publication, including a fascinating collection of letters written when Darwin was 12.

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The Correspondence of Charles Darwin provides, for the first time, the full, authoritative texts of all known and available letters to and from Charles Darwin, the originator of the theory of evolution by natural selection. The letters are accompanied by detailed explanatory footnotes and relevant supplementary materials, and offer unparalleled insight into Darwin's experiments, thoughts, friendships, and family life. Volume 12 of this continuing series contains letters for 1864, when Darwin, despite continuing illness, was carrying out botanical experiments and working on his book, The Variation of Plants and Animals under Domestication. The volume also sheds light on the worldwide reception of Darwin's theory, with letters from correspondents in the United States and Germany, and also on the continuing controversy in Britain, especially with the award of the Royal Society's prestigious Copley Medal to Darwin at the end of the year.

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The correspondence in this volume is dominated by the public and private response to the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species. Volume 8 opens with Darwin eagerly scrutinising each new review, as one by one all the major organs of the day carried notices of the book. To those who express their views privately in letters, Darwin responds patiently and thoughtfully, answering their objections and attempting to guide their fuller understanding of the operation of natural selection. His more personal thoughts emerge in letters to his friends Joseph Dalton Hooker, Charles Lyell, and Thomas Henry Huxley. This volume presents a wealth of detailed information, giving the full range of response to the Origin and revealing how the Victorians coped with a theory that many well recognised would revolutionise thinking about the organic world and human ancestry.

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The correspondence in this volume reveals Darwin carefully monitoring the response to The Origin of Species. Early in 1861 he completed the preparation of a third and much-revised edition, using the opportunity to answer his critics. As these letters make clear, Darwin understood the importance of support from younger scientists for the future of his theory. Darwin's long-time supporters - including Asa Gray, Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker - also feature largely in his correspondence. Escaping the confines of collating and writing up his work on variation in domesticated animals and plants, Darwin plunged into detailed studies of insectivorous plants and orchid pollination. On a more personal side, the correspondence details Darwin in the role of solicitous father ensuring a secure future for his son William. The letters in Volume 9 provide another indispensable collection for those interested in Darwin's life, work and world.

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The correspondence in this volume reveals the two sides of Darwin's life in a new intensity. It opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin's oldest and best loved daughter, Anne, and goes on to show how Darwin sought relief from his loss through work, with a single-minded but increasingly weary commitment to the completion of his cirripede monographs. In September 1854, as soon as the final proofs of the last barnacle volume had been returned to the printer, Darwin threw himself into a resumption of his species work. He followed up old ideas by initiating new experiments and establishing a worldwide correspondence that encompassed geographical distribution, variation, and plant and animal breeding. The wealth of letters through 1855 makes evident the frenzy of intellectual activity that followed Darwin's terse announcement in his diary: 'Sept. 9th (1854) began sorting notes for Species Theory ...'

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The letters in this volume cover two of the most momentous years in Darwin's life. Begun in 1856 and the fruit of twenty years of study and reflection, Darwin's manuscript on the species question was a little more than half finished, and at least two years from publication, when in June 1858 Darwin unexpectedly received a letter and a manuscript from Alfred Russel Wallace indicating that he too had independently formulated a theory of natural selection. The letters detail the various stages in the preparation of what was to become one of the world's most famous works: Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, published by John Murray in November 1859. They reveal the first impressions of Darwin's book given by his most trusted confidants, and they relate Darwin's anxious response to the early reception of his theory by friends, family members, and prominent naturalists. This volume provides the capstone to Darwin's remarkable efforts for more than two decades to solve one of nature's greatest riddles - the origin of species.

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This is the fourth volume of the complete edition of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. For the first time full authoritative texts of Darwin's letters are available, edited according to modern textual editorial principles and practice. This volume covers the first years of Darwin's study of the structure and systematics of barnacles: work that involved a worldwide search for specimens, detailed microscopic investigations, a consideration of the theoretical assumptions underlying classification schemes, and the solution of practical problems of zoological nomenclature. Darwin's convictions about the nature and origin of species influenced his observations and conclusions and provided insights that led to some remarkable discoveries. Throughout this period Darwin also maintained his involvement in major geological debates, as shown by important exchanges with Charles Lyell, Robert Chambers, James Dwight Dana, Bernhard Studer, and others. The letters to Darwin include Joseph Dalton Hooker's descriptions of his dramatic and frequently dangerous travels through previously closed regions of Sikkim and Tibet.

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This is the second volume of the complete edition of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. For the first time full authoritative texts of Darwin's letters are available, edited according to modern textual editorial principles and practice. The letters in this volume were written during the seven years following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage. It was a period of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional man with official responsibilities in several scientific organisations. During these years he published two books and fifteen papers and also organised and superintended the publication of the Zoology of the Voyage of HMS Beagle, for which he described the locations of the fossils and the habitats and behaviour of the living species he had collected. Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family ties and friendships, and to make new friends among the naturalists with whom his work brought him into close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return Darwin became engaged to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, whom he subsequently married.

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This is the third volume of the complete edition of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. For the first time full authoritative texts of Darwin's letters are available, edited according to modern textual editorial principles and practice. The letters in this volume were written during the years 1844-1846. By 1844 Darwin had become an established figure within the circle of London naturalists and his life at Down had assumed the regularity that the responsibility for a thriving and growing household entailed. Despite his move to rural Kent, Darwin was not isolated, and this volume shows how frequent were his trips to London and further afield, how regular his meetings with his scientific colleagues, and how extensive his network of correspondents.

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This pivotal volume in the definitive edition of Charles Darwin's letters covers the year 1871, the year in which Descent of Man, Darwin's first public statement on human evolution, was published. The large number of letters in this year - more than 800 - reflects the excitement this caused. Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from a growing network of contacts all over the world and to discuss his emerging ideas with colleagues, many of whom he never met in person. This year also saw the marriage of Darwin's daughter Henrietta, the first of his children to marry; the volume includes her personal journal of the year, published here for the first time, which complements letters that hint at her important role in her father's work as both commentator and editor. Notes and appendixes put these fascinating and wide-ranging letters in context, making them accessible to both scholars and general readers.

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This volume covers the culmination of Darwin's work on species. From early in 1856, when he was persuaded that the time had come to publish an account of his heterodox theories, through 1857, Darwin's letters document the labour involved in composing his 'big species book', his zest for research, and his unflagging determination to succeed. As always, old friends and more recent acquaintances were drawn into the project. Darwin writes for the first time to Alfred Russel Wallace seeking specimens of Malayan fowls. Joseph Dalton Hooker is his sounding-board for botanical speculations and Thomas Henry Huxley soon takes up a similar role in matters of comparative anatomy and embryology. William Bernhard Tegetmeier is the provider of pigeons and poultry and Asa Gray dispatches from Massachusetts invaluable botanical data. Darwin fully exploits his gift for drawing the best from his correspondents and, collectively, their letters provide a remarkable survey of what was - and was not - believed about the nature and origin of species in the middle years of the nineteenthcentury.

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This volume inaugurates a complete edition of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. For the first time full authoritative texts of Darwin's letters are available, edited according to modern textual editorial principles and practice. The first volume of the edition contains the letters of the years 1821-1836. They begin with one written to Darwin at the age of twelve and continue through his school days at Shrewsbury, his two years as a medical student at Edinburgh, the undergraduate years at Cambridge, and his five years of exploration and learning during the voyage of the Beagle. These were Darwin's years of initiation and preparation for a life of science. In the earliest letters Darwin appears already keenly interested in natural history and an avid collector of minerals, plants, marine invertebrates, and insects - especially beetles. The letters of the succeeding years tell the story of the young Darwin's development up to his return to England when, at the age of twenty-seven, he was received as a colleague by Charles Lyell, Adam Sedgwick, and other leading scientists, who had already heard of his discoveries and observations during the Beagle voyage.

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This volume includes many letters not previously published, and chronicles a year that was enlivened by scientific controversy and filled with scientific queries and discussions relating to Darwin's transmutation theory. His love of botany and his expanding experimental programme is well depicted by correspondence with professional botanists, horticulturalists, and hobbyists. Nine appendixes complement the letters by providing additional information from the Darwin Archive and from nineteenth-century publications. The letters also provide glimpses of life among the Victorian gentry, and reveal the practical and emotional support Darwin received from his family. Awarded the Founder's Medal of the Society of the History of Natural History, and the Modern Language Association of America's first Morton N. Cohen Award for a distinguished edition of letters.

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This volume is part of the definitive edition of letters written by and to Charles Darwin, the most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century. It is already an important source for students and scholars in many academic disciplines. Notes and appendixes put these fascinating and wide-ranging letters in context, making the letters accessible to both scholars and general readers. Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from all over the world, and to discuss his emerging ideas with scientific colleagues, many of whom he never met in person. The letters are published chronologically: Volume 18 includes letters from 1870, as well as a supplement of more than a hundred recently discovered or redated letters from before 1870. During 1870 Darwin was making final preparations for publication of Descent of Man, as well as continuing his research on expression in humans and animals.

「Nielsen BookData」より

This volume is part of the definitive edition of letters written by and to Charles Darwin, the most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century. Notes and appendixes put these fascinating and wide-ranging letters in context, making the letters accessible to both scholars and general readers. Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from all over the world and to discuss his emerging ideas with scientific colleagues, many of whom he never met in person. The letters are published chronologically: volume 20 includes letters from 1872, the year in which The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals was published, making ground-breaking use of photography. Also in this year, the sixth and final edition of On the Origin of Species was published and Darwin resumed his work on carnivorous plants and plant movement, finding unexpected similarities between the plant and animal kingdoms.

「Nielsen BookData」より

This volume is part of the definitive edition of letters written by and to Charles Darwin, the most celebrated naturalist of the nineteenth century. Notes and appendixes put these fascinating and wide-ranging letters in context, making the letters accessible to both scholars and general readers. Darwin depended on correspondence to collect data from all over the world, and to discuss his emerging ideas with scientific colleagues, many of whom he never met in person. The letters are published chronologically: Volume 21 includes letters from 1873, the year in which Darwin received responses to his work on human and animal expression. Also in this year, Darwin continued his work on carnivorous plants and plant movement, finding unexpected similarities between the plant and animal kingdoms, raised a subscription for his friend Thomas Henry Huxley, and decided to employ a scientific secretary for the first time - his son Francis.

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'I have always maintained that, excepting fools, men did not differ much in intellect, only in zeal & hard work; and I still think there is an eminently important difference'. Throughout 1869, Darwin continued to collect data for his two most significant books after Origin: The Descent of Man and Expression of the Emotions. Explorers, diplomats, and missionaries all over the world were politely encouraged to investigate, for example, how emotions such as surprise, anger and shame were expressed in different cultures. As Darwin's research on human evolution neared completion, he learned that Alfred Russel Wallace, the co-discoverer of the theory, had begun to raise questions about its application to certain aspects of human development, attributing these to the action of a 'higher power'. In his correspondence, Wallace alluded to his belief in spiritualism, which he fully believed to be open to scientific investigation, but which gave Darwin much pause.

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[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgewood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence, 1864
  • Appendix I. Translations
  • Appendix II. Chronology
  • Appendix III. Presentation list for 'Three forms of Lythrum salicaria'
  • Appendix IV. Darwin and the Copley Medal
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

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[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence 1861
  • Appendices
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence, 1860
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Bibliographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations
  • The Correspondence 1858-9
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence, 1856-7
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • THE CORRESPONDENCE
  • Appendixes: I. Translations, II. Chronology, III. Diplomas, IV. Darwin's queries about expression
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • THE CORRESPONDENCE
  • Supplement to the Correspondence, 1835-69
  • Appendixes: I. Translations
  • II. Chronology
  • III. Diplomas
  • IV. Darwin's queries about expression
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence, 1862
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence, 1863
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence, 1865
  • Supplement to the Correspondence, 1822-1864
  • Appendix I. Translations
  • Appendix II. Chronology
  • Appendix III. Diplomas
  • Appendix IV. Note on Darwin's health
  • Appendix V. The Lyell-Lubbock dispute
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence
  • Appendix I. Translations
  • Appendix II. Chronology
  • Appendix III. Diplomas presented to Charles Darwin
  • Appendix IV. Reviews of Expression
  • Appendix V. Draft subscription list for Thomas Henry Huxley
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The Correspondence
  • Expression supplement
  • Appendixes: I. Translations
  • II. Chronology
  • III. Diplomas presented to Charles Darwin
  • IV. Presentation lists for Origin 6th ed.
  • V. Presentation lists for Expression
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence, 1821-36
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence, 1837-43
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence, 1844-6
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Bibliographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence, 1847-1850
  • Appendixes
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • The correspondence
  • Appendixes: 1. Translations
  • 2. Chronology
  • 3. Diplomas presented to Charles Darwin
  • 4. Presentation list for Descent
  • 5. Reviews of Descent
  • 6. Henrietta Emma Darwin's journal, 1871
  • 7. Darwin's Queries about expression
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgments
  • Note on editorial policy
  • List of provenances
  • Darwin/Wedgwood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • Part I. The Correspondence, 1851-55: Appendices
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Bibliography
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Index.

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[目次]

  • Part I: List of illustrations
  • Frederick Henry Burkhardt (1912-2007)
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of Provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgewood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • THE CORRESPONDENCE, January-June 1868
  • Part II: List of illustrations
  • THE CORRESPONDENCE, July-December 1868
  • Appendices I. Translations
  • II. Chronology
  • III. Diplomas
  • IV. Presentation lists for Variation
  • V. Darwin's Queries about expression
  • VI. Reviews of Variation
  • Manuscript alterations and comments
  • Biographical register and index to correspondents
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on manuscript sources
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

[目次]

  • List of illustrations
  • Frederick Henry Burkhardt (1912-2007)
  • List of letters
  • Introduction
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of provenances
  • Note on editorial policy
  • Darwin/Wedgewood genealogy
  • Abbreviations and symbols
  • THE CORRESPONDENCE, 1869
  • Appendices
  • Bibliography
  • Index.

「Nielsen BookData」より

この本の情報

書名 The correspondence of Charles Darwin
著作者等 Burkhardt, Frederick
Darwin, Charles
Secord, James A
Smith, Sydney
Browne Janet (University of Cambridge Library)
Browne Janet (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
Dean Sheila Ann
Evans Samantha
Harvey Joy (University of Cambridge Library)
Innes Shelley
Kohn David
Montgomery William
Pearn Alison M.
Porter Duncan M. (University of Cambridge Library)
Porter Duncan M.
Richmond Marsha (University of Cambridge Library)
Secord James
The Editors of the Darwin Correspondence Project
Topham Jonathan R. (University of Cambridge Library)
White Paul S.
Wilmot Sarah
Burkhardt Frederick H.
巻冊次 v. 1. 1821-1836
v. 2. 1837-1843
v. 3. 1844-1846
v. 4. 1847-1850
v. 5. 1851-1855
v. 6. 1856-1857
v. 7. 1858-1859
v. 8. 1860
v. 9. 1861
v. 10. 1862
v. 11. 1863
v. 12. 1864
v. 13. 1865
v. 14. 1866
v. 15. 1867
v. 16
v. 16, pt. 1. Jan.-Jun. 1868
v. 16, pt. 2. Jul.-Dec. 1868
v. 17. 1869
v. 18. 1870
v. 19. 1871
v. 20. 1872
v. 21. 1873
v. 22. 1874
v. 23. 1875
v. 24. 1876
v. 25. 1877
v. 26. 1878
v. 27. 1879
出版元 Cambridge University Press
刊行年月 1985-
ページ数 v.
大きさ 24 cm
ISBN 0521255864
0521255899
0521255902
0521255910
0521385644
0521451566
0521590329
0521590337
0521590345
0521824133
0521255880
9780521190305
9780521442411
9780521518369
9780521768894
9780521844598
9780521859318
9780521881951
9780521881968
9781107016484
9781107038448
9781107052147
9781107088726
9781107134362
9781107180574
9781108423045
9781108475402
9781108493758
9780521255875
NCID BA00679781
※クリックでCiNii Booksを表示
言語 英語
出版国 イギリス
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