Politics as a practical science

Wilhelm Hennis ; translated by Keith Tribe

Wilhelm Hennis defends here the idea that politics is a 'practical' science, a moral science belonging to a tradition reaching back to Aristotle and opposed to the empirical science of politics originating in the seventeenth century. Well-known outside Germany for his seminal writings on Max Weber, these essays demonstrate the wider context of his thinking in the constitutional and popular politics of a 'new democracy': the Federal Republic of Germany, created in 1949. During the 1950s Hennis was first a Bundestag assistant, and then in Frankfurt as academic assistant to Carlo Schmid, a leading constitutionalist who also played a major part in the modernization of the SPD. His critique of 'radical' politics during the 1970s, represented here by two polemical essays on the problems of legitimacy and of democracy, drew upon his acute grasp of political theory, and his practical experience of party and government politics. Three later essays -- on Tocqueville, Goya and Max Weber -- demonstrate how the skills of political argument can be applied to classical figures.

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[目次]

  • Introduction
  • D.Kelly The Problem of the German Conception of the State The Idea of Office and the Concept of Democracy Democratization: Concept and Problematic Legitimacy: On a Category of Civil Society Tocqueville's 'New Political Science' Goya's Reason and the Project of Modernity: Seeking Understanding of 'The Dream of Reason' (Capricho 43) 'Hellenic Intellectual Culture' and the Origins of Weber's Political Thinking Political Science as a Vocation: A Personal Account

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この本の情報

書名 Politics as a practical science
著作者等 Hennis, Wilhelm
Tribe, Keith
書名別名 Politik als praktische Wissenschaft
シリーズ名 New perspectives in German political studies
出版元 Palgrave Macmillan
刊行年月 2009
ページ数 xviii, 250 p.
大きさ 23 cm
ISBN 9780230007284
NCID BB02293942
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言語 英語
出版国 イギリス
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